#science #whales #geotracking

Tracking world's largest animals

If you were tasked with finding and tracking a 25-meter long object, you could probably apply your Electrical Engineering skills to devise a range of different methods. Whilst these methods might work on land, applying them to an aquatic environment causes problems. Conventional techniques - involving the transmission of (RF-)signals - are quickly eliminated by the attenuating properties of water (at roughly 9dB/mm [1]). This is a major problem for marine biologists who seek to track marine animals and their migration movements. ...

#Junction #Interview #Professor #Semiconductor

Junction: A chat with prof. dr. Jurriaan Schmitz

We visited Jurriaan Schmitz, professor in Semiconductor Components and head of the research group Integrated Devices and Systems (IDS). He leads a group of around 35 people working on MEMS devices, diodes, and basically anything using semiconductors. The group does research on the hardware related to these devices. Questions such as ‘which materials should you use and combine to make something?’ are commonly addressed by research within the group. With their research, the group is always looking at ways to make transistors faster, cheaper or smaller (preferably all three). ...